The End of Deals and The End of CDMA

The End of Deals?

I mentioned how I helped a client save over $500 annually on their Comcast bill last week.  Unfortunately, that might be the last notch I can put in my “service savings belt” for a while.  One thing I predict is that it is going to be harder to strike deals with them in the new year due to their “Vision 2020” campaign.  This is an internal company framework which states that they are not going to give discounts to existing customers like they used to.   The reason why I was able to save the aforementioned client so much was because she was paying for a pricing model that was out of date for the package she had.  There were no contracts or promotions signed up for.   Of course you can save money by cutting services, but when I bring that up not many have an appetite for doing so.  Be flexible, consider competitors, especially those areas of West Hartford where Go Net Speed exists. 

Cell Phone Market Is Changing – Part 2

I see real changes coming to the market toward the end of the year and going forward.   Remember, back in the day, when Verizon was known for those “Can you hear me now?” commercials with Test Man Paul? (He works for Sprint now, go figure!)   Their greatness was built on their CDMA digital calling network which launched in the mid 1990s.  As analog was phased out in the early 2000s, that Verizon CDMA signal was known to penetrate everywhere — especially buildings.   Starting in around 2014, Verizon, ATT and the other carriers began rolling out calling on their LTE data network.  Some would argue that the calls are clearer, but I think the signal just doesn’t have the reach of the old CDMA and legacy calling networks.   ATT shut down their GSM network a few years ago, but they still have 3G calling to fall back on along with LTE.   Verizon’s CDMA calling network will be completely shut down by 01/01/21, after extending the deadline by a year in 2019.

Verizon says the CDMA shutdown is necessary to fully roll out LTE and 5G everywhere.  This is a last call for all of the Verizon people out there.  If you have an iPhone 5s or older, old Android phone (non LTE calling), or old flip phone —  You will need a new device by the end of 2020.   Verizon has no 3G calling network to fall back on. I really wonder if the improvements to the LTE calling network will make up for the elimination of CDMA.  Furthermore,  5G will add new wavelengths and capacity that we can communicate on but 5G phones are cost prohibitive right now and owned by so few.   Wait until Apple starts selling 5G phones, then you know it will be the right time to buy one.  Then you will know that this new technology is ready for everyday use. 

Statement on Mesh Routers

I wanted to issue a clarifying statement on the topic of “Mesh Routers” because someone had questioned whether I was against mesh routers and that I might want to reconsider my position.  

Mesh routers are 2 and 3 unit + router systems that can help to bridge the gaps for WiFI in large homes or homes that may have trouble getting a signal in specific areas.   Well known mesh router brands are Netgear Orbi and Eero.   Xfinity also providers their own mesh solution called XFI pods, make for them by a company called Plume. 

For the record, I am not nor have I ever been against mesh routers.   I have been setting up mesh router systems for clients since 2017.  I have worked with a precursor to the modern day mesh systems (ie. Netgear Powerline) for over 10 years.  In my experience, the mesh systems work in some instances and do not work in others.   If you are in a WiFi challenged situation, it may be worth it to buy a mesh system from a vendor with a good return policy (like Amazon) to try out.   If they don’t work out, you can always go back to your old router system.

Also, keep in mind the cost.  While a good single router is going to cost you approximately $200, a mesh system will cost you $300 to $400 for the Eero or Orbi.   The Xfinity XFI pods are $119 for 3 pods and $199 for 6 pods, depending on the size of the house. You need to be renting a “modern” modem from them (approx $15 per month) to use these specific pods. 

Be flexible.  Be willing to try out a couple of solutions to find what works best for you.

Deals Report and Cell Phone Market Preview

Deals Report

One score and one miss.

I will start with miss first.   I know that some of you are likely looking for a quality laptop this year.  You know how I rave about the Lenovo Thinkpad (IBM’s old line) and the Dell Latitude systems.  In fact they are better than the current crop of Mac Books.   For what seemed like this weekend only, Lenovo was offering an unbelievable $629 price on a fully decked out Thinkpad T480. It was brand new, even though the T480 was the 2018 model.  I wish I could have gotten this information out to you sooner but I just wasn’t able to.  By Monday morning, the price had jumped back to $2029.   This 14 inch laptop is every bit as high quality as a 13 / 15 inch Mac Book Pro and in my opinion better. 

I am pleased to report that I was successful in helping a client save big money on their Comcast bill.  I was able to get them an annualized savings of $576, with monthly pricing going from $268 to $220.  The name of the Comcast package was called Select Triple Play.  The particulars that influenced this deal included a phone modem rented from Comcast ($14 – 15 approx.)  2 cable boxes, and HD service was included in the deal.  The Select Triple Play includes the Digital Preferred cable TV package, one level higher than the “standard” TV package, and Blast internet (300 mbps).   This deal is apparently an everyday price, no strings had to be pulled and no arms had to be twisted.  Fees can go up in the future, as always.   Please see my last update.   In this scenario, the client could save the modem rental charge by buying their own telephone capable modem (approx $200) but it would take about 1.5 years for the cost savings to equal out.  Given that this particular client’s house is known for lightning strikes and modems have been replaced in the past — renting is likely the best option. 

If you are wondering about the Standard Triple Play, pricing will be a little less.   If you can get a promotion guaranteed for 12 or 24 months, pricing will be even lower but you will have to sign a contract on those promos.   What I can say is this, if you are getting all 3 services from Comcast not including any extra packages – $175 to $225 is very normal these days.  As with the computers, promotional packages can be here one week and gone the next. 

Preview:  Cell Phone Market is Changing

I am going to get into this more in a future update.  However, I see the cell phone market changing a lot as we move to the end of 2020 and beyond.  Old networks are being shut down and the carriers are going to rely exclusively on advanced networks like LTE and 5G.  There have been a ton of layoffs and I think this has put a lot of strain on delivering positive customer experiences.  

Based on personal experiences and helping clients, I would say my ranking of best providers in terms of customer service are

1. Consumer Cellular (ATT Network)

2. T-Mobile

3. Xfinity Mobile (there will be some changes coming Feb 1, however)

4. Verizon

*Verizon has really fallen in my opinion.   I also don’t have a lot of data to go off of with ATT directly, that is why I did not mention them.  A provider can have great service on technical merits, but I think what my typical client (age 60+) cares so much about is the level of customer care provided.  No one wants to wait on the phone for 2 or 3 hours to be heard. 

Technically yours,

Comcast Sticking It To Us | Best of 2019

Comcast Sticking It To Us

I don’t know if you noticed this with your December Comcast bill, but I wasn’t too pleased to see what they are doing effective 12/20/2019.  Although I am under an existing contract for a guaranteed price for my internet and TV through May 2020 — my fees will be going up.   I believe they can raise the fees portion of the bill even if you are in a contract.  If you are not in a contract, your fees will definitely be going up.   So here is the damage —  Broadcast TV fee (designed to capture what local stations charge Comcast for transmitting their feeds to us) $10 to $14.95, TV box fee (charge for that 1st cable box) $2.50 to $4.60, and the remote fee is going up from $0.18 to $0.40.  So this looks like an additional $7.27 if I did the math correctly.  Are the retransmission fees that Comcast is charged by the local stations going up?   I don’t know.   I also know that prices of most internet packages are going up $3 per month, however, I don’t think this applies to me as I am in a bundled promotion.  More and more people are cutting the cord and going with internet only.  Comcast is looking to make up for their loss in subscribers one way or another.  For a lot of customers in Connecticut, there isn’t much choice outside of areas where Frontier has fiber optic service.  The non-Fiber frontier service is pathetic.  There really is no alternative but Comcast.  Some of you have the ability to choose Go Net Speed.  They are available in limited parts of West Hartford and the New Haven area. Hopefully they will be rolling out beyond their existing footprint soon. A great choice for Internet only!

Best of 2019

I used to write this up in more of a newsletter format, but I just wanted to give you a brief sampling of some of the best products and services I worked with all year. 

Best Premium Smartphone: iPhone 11 — Apple really got this one right and they lowered the starting price by $50.  It’s an easy choice for iPhone owners

Best Mid-Range Smartphone:   Google Pixel 3a — Google brought out these phones mid-year that were in the same spirit as their old Nexus phones.  They are under $400 with a lot of premium features and they still have a headphone jack.  I hope we see a Pixel 4a in 2020.   We may also see an iPhone SE 2 or iPhone 9 sold in this price range next year.

Best Laptops:  Unfortunately — I can’t say that any Apple laptops are among the best of 2019.  However I really like 2 product lines the Lenovo Thinkpads and the Dell Latitudes.  Specifically I am a fan of the Thinkpad T490, E490, and X1 Carbon 7.  In terms of the Latitudes, I favor the 5000 and 7000 series.  They are solid, have great keyboards, and are built for the long haul. 

Best Desktops: I still like the 2018 Mac Mini and hope Apple keeps it updated for years to come.  I am also partial to Dell’s Optiplex and Lenovo’s Think Centre desktops, properly equipped of course. 

Best Backup Service:   Keep in mind that iCloud, Dropbox, or One Drive are not true backup services.  They are online file synchronization services.  This means that if you delete a file it will be deleted in other places. You should have an opportunity to restore the deleted file within a period of time.  I still love all of those services but they are not true backups.  If you have a lot of data that you can’t afford to lose, I highly recommend Backblaze or Carbonite.  Either service is $6 / month for personal use. 

Where We’ve Come In A Decade

As we come to the end of the year, we also come to the end of the 2010’s.  (Whether or not it’s truly the end of the decade, may be a technicality.  Some of my elementary school teachers would have said that the decade is 2011-2020), but for all intents and purposes many in the technology community are looking at how far we have come in the last 10 years.

I will just give you a few of my thoughts. I  will also ask you, how has your use of technology changed in 10 years?

-The iPhone was not Apple’s bread and butter in 2010.  In the USA, it was still an AT&T exclusive.  Verizon users were being pushed to get a DROID, which was special branding put on Android phones made specifically for Verizon.  Big iPhone competitors that year were the Motorola DROID, the DROID X, and the HTC DROID Incredible.  As a Verizon customer, I could not get an iPhone.  My first smartphone was the Incredible.   Everything opened up in early 2011 when Verizon came to an agreement to sell the iPhone on their network.  I got my first iPhone in the fall of 2013 and haven’t looked back.

-The 2010’s were also the decade of the iPad.  I acquired my first iPad in 2010. To be honest, I didn’t see much use for it in the beginning and I sold it in about 6 months.  Today, we see the iPad as the tablet done right.  It does not run a full, traditional computer operating system (now called iPad OS) but it gets the job done well enough for quite a few folks as a primary computing device and nearly everyone else as a “secondary screen”.   Want to use it in the hand?  You can check email, shop, bank, read books, and watch TV / video.  Want to use it with a keyboard?  It is a near laptop.  When Apple came out with the iPad Pro a few years back — they really blurred the lines between Mac and iPad. I don’t think it’s a bad thing, though I would still prefer a full Mac / Windows computer as my #1 device.  There was a lull in the iPad market in 2015 and 2016.  It seemed like it wasn’t going anywhere.  But then, Apple lowered the price of the “standard iPad”  (9.7 inch, now 10.2) to $329 in 2017 and sales have gone up like wild flowers.

-10 years ago — many people thought the PC (personal computer) would soon be dead.  Remember when netbooks were a big thing?  These were small – 9 or 10 inch — very underpowered Windows laptops that were meant for travel and quick browsing or e-mail.    I fondly remember — hacking a Dell netbook and putting the Mac OS on it.  It ran well for a while.  The keyboard on that netbook was excellent, though cramped.  Fast forward to 2019 and the PC is not dead.  The industry has innovated.   In late 2010, Apple released a timeless design with its 2nd generation Mac Book Air.   This Ultrabook design helped change Windows PC’s for the better.  No longer did a powerful machine have to be a big clunker.  Microsoft also got into the market in 2012 by releasing its own line of tablet computers called Sufrace.  The original Surface concept (which ran a limited version of Windows RT) was a flop, but the Surface Pro (which runs full Windows) has been a huge success.  This 12 inch tablet, with keyboard has aged with conservative design changes and is really the gold standard for small, sub-13 inch computers.   Consumers with simpler needs have moved to the smartphone and the iPad, in some instances – exclusively, but the PC market is still here.  The premium PC market is strong.

-During the past 10 years — especially 2016-19 — Apple lost its perch in the laptop market.  Beginning in 2016, they wanted to get so thin and light in order to shave a couple of millimeters that they released a horrible keyboard design.   Many claims of defects were made and lots of warranty work had to be done.  The problem became so bad that in 2018, Apple decided to give all owners of the new Mac Book Pros a 4 year warranty on the keyboards.  This special warranty now covers the late 2016 to 2019 13 and 15 inch Mac Book Pros and the 2018 and 2019 Mac Book Airs. Good news! Apple has seen the error of its ways and recently came out with a new 16 inch laptop with the old 2015 style keyboard.  Hallelujah! We can only hope that Apple will revise the 13 inch Mac Books (models my clients would be most likely to buy) accordingly next year.

-On a personal note, I just want to say that I have learned over the course of 10 years that not everything online is better.  10 years ago, I was actively pursuing my Bachelor’s degree online (with a few on campus courses mixed in).  That evolved into an exclusively online Master’s for the academic portion, with some in-person internship or practicum experiences.  It was a colossal $60,000 mistake.  Some day, I should write an article or short guide about online college studies.  Ultimately, what I learned is that online education is not appropriate for all learners and career objectives.  Just because it’s more convenient or you are a technologically savvy person or you can express yourself more freely by typing — does not mean an online degree is appropriate.   Online education would be appropriate for someone who is already established in an industry, even in an entry level way, and they are aiming for their degree (hopefully with the encouragement of management) in order to advance in that field.  Online degrees are right for someone with an established network that is using that degree to get a bump in pay due to that accomplishment (ie. a teacher getting a salary increase for a Master’s).  Online coursework would not be appropriate for someone looking to blaze a new path in a field where they have no relationships.   That is where I got lost in the maze.  I also believe formal college education is not right for everyone and that trade schools and apprenticeships are a very sustainable path for our young workers.  It makes me think of a picture that you have problem seen passed around in chain e-mails depicting two “learners.”   Jim — 4 year degree in Philosophy – $100K in debt, no job.   Joe — 4 year paid apprenticeship. No debt. $80K a year salary.   Today, Joe works for the electric company and cut off Jim’s lights for non-payment.  Sad, but could be very true.  

JimandJoe

Beware of Unlimited Cell Phone Plans

If I were to think of my customers’ cellular plans as a whole, I would say most are with Verizon or AT&T.  Coming in 3rd place would be Consumer Cellular and 4th would probably be one of the Tracfone brands.   Verizon and AT&T are increasingly trying to push their customers into Unlimited plans.  I want you to be careful about what you are getting sold.  Verizon and ATT offer multiple levels of Unlimited plans.   Sorry to make this into a comedy sketch — but isn’t Unlimited – Unlimited? What’s going on here? Why do you need 4 plans called Unlimited, Verizon?  Here is the problem, Verizon’s LTE network is very congested in many parts of the country.  It’s getting better, but still jammed.  The same could be said for ATT, but I think it’s not as bad.  To compensate for this, Verizon and ATT have set “deprioritization limits” for their unlimited plans when network congestion occurs.  So you have Unlimited minutes, unlimited texts, and unlimited use of data.  However, during those times of congestion — you will not be able to access data with the same priority / speed as other prioritized customers.   This means when you really need to search something on Google or send an important e-mail out or other activity that uses data, you may struggle to surf the Internet.  (Keep in mind no part of this discussion applies to use on your home WiFi.) The first level Unlimited plans with Verizon and ATT actually have a 0 deprioritization limit.  This means you are subject to deprioritization at ANY TIME.   You may never be affected by this, but I just want you to know the facts.  If you are a heavy data user and like to watch video on cellular data – I would suggest at least the 2nd tier Unlimited plans.  On the ATT Unlimited Extra plan, the first 50 GB of data is prioritized.  On Verizon’s Play More Unlimited the first 25 GB of data is prioritized.  Better unlimited plans exist with each carrier.  If I needed Unlimited I would start with those plans.  By comparison, T-Mobile’s base level Magenta unlimited plan (including the age 55 and over 2 for $70 plan discount option) comes with a 50 GB deprioritization limit.

The good thing is, many of my clients don’t use that much data.  You are on “metered” data plans giving you 2 GB or 4 GB, etc. of data per month.  If this is you; you are in the fast lane.  These monthly billed, metered data plans from ATT and Verizon are prioritized.  You will have priority over the fake-o Unlimited, always deprioritized plans.

Advice On ATT Yahoo Email Accounts

I’m sending this message out to the group of you that still use e-mail accounts that date back to when ATT (formerly SBC and SNET) was our local phone company.  I have shared the story and these tips before but it doesn’t hurt repeating this advice along with some new information.

The old advice — which is still valid  —

1. When Frontier took over the internet service in Connecticut in 2014, they did not take over the ownership of these e-mail accounts.  I don’t blame Frontier for this.  These accounts which were a partnership between ATT and  Yahoo (and not a very happy relationship right now) are a messy situation, in my opinion.

2. You are still technically a “customer” of ATT and you have an account # though you are not a paying customer.

3.  All customer service pertaining to these accounts needs to be sought out directly from ATT.  There are Contact Us options on ATT.com.  That is the only website you should go to.  I have had several customers — unfortunately — get ripped off for hundreds of $$ each because they trying Googling for support on their SBCGLOBAL, ATT, or SNET e-mail accounts.  It didn’t end well for them and I got called in to clean up the scams.   Most of the ATT support is overseas, but it is real support that you do not have to pay for.

4.  The management of your account — including changing the password or looking up your account # can be found by logging into your account at ATT.com.  Again there you will also find chat support and phone support options.  You just have to be persistent in clicking through the menus. 

5.  As I have shared many times before — you should be in the process of moving beyond this old e-mail account.  It is true that you may have tons of e-mails sorted in a lot of folders in your old ATT Yahoo account.  It could be painful and expensive to move these e-mails to a new account.  It’s ok — no problem.  Leave them with ATT Yahoo.  But you should really start conducting all new e-mail business from a new account.   Google – Gmail,  Outlook.com (the old Microsoft Hotmail), iCloud (especially if you use an iPhone or Mac), Comcast e-mail (if you are now a Comcast customer), or a regular Yahoo.com e-mail account (not tied to ATT) are all better more reliable options.   For a paid consumer level e-mail service — I am a big fan of Fastmail.com.   They charge about $30 a year and do provide support if you need help.  That is another option.  You don’t necessarily have to delete the old ATT Yahoo account but I am telling you to start moving beyond it.

NEW INFO

It has come to my attention that some of my clients are having trouble logging into their ATT Yahoo email through the web browser.  I think this is some type of problem on the back end with ATT and Yahoo. I hope it is resolved soon.   It seems that if you have the Yahoo Mail app installed on iPhone / Android or have the account programmed into the Mail app on iPhone, iPad or Android — that there isn’t a problem.

If you do have an issue logging in with the web browser and you are sure the password is right.  Clear the history in your browser and try to log in again.  Do not choose the option to keep yourself logged in for 2 weeks.  Try not to sign out of your account or close your browser or you will have to sign in again.   If you need a little help clearing your browser history — read here  https://home.bt.com/tech-gadgets/internet/browsers/how-to-delete-web-history-windows-xp-vista-upgrade-browser-stay-safe-internet-explorer-firefox-google-chrome-11363853878507

If you do close your browser — you will have to sign in again and clearing the history first may be required.   Again, I hope this is just a temporary solution.

Regardless, you should be moving beyond the ATT Yahoo account for everyday e-mail.  You are not an ATT customer anymore. They don’t owe you anything.  I would not expect improved reliability in the future.